My Vegan Blueberry Pancake Recipe

In an ideal world, my backyard would be an edible feast that would cater to all of my culinary whims. A haven where fruits and vegetables could grow in abundance, Mother Nature would change her menu according to the seasons and leave me with beautiful treasures to pick from her harvest. Since my gardening skills are virtually non-existent at this point, the next best thing is to pack my basket and head to the local farm, which I did over my summer holiday in Montreal.

la ferme quinn Quebec perspective photo

Located forty minutes outside of Montreal, La Ferme Quinn is my farm of choice whenever I take a trip to the Great White North (a nickname for Canada). Established in 1982, this family-run farm is one that has been passed on through the generations, and is home to some of the finest seasonal goodies in the region. Equipped with barn, a bakery, and a play yard, Quinn is the ideal place for children, big or small. Food lovers will be thrilled to know that there’s a shop stocked with locally produced artisanal foods and gourmet products, making it a win/win place to spend a family-centric afternoon.

quin farm front photo

kids play yard quinn farm

I had the chance to visit the farm twice over the summer. The first time was to hunt for blueberries, and my second visit was for the honey harvest (more on my “bee” experience in a future post).

closeup of a blueberry bush

After arriving at Quinn to pick our berries, we made a quick stop to the barn to visit a few resident animals before heading towards what seemed like endless rows of blueberry fields.

blueberry fiels in quebec

Armed with our farmer’s baskets, as well as a determination to pick enough fruit to last the summer, my children and friends quickly learned how to navigate through the bushes with ease, and managed to score some of the juiciest berries they had ever laid their eyes on!

girl picking berries

picking wild blueberries at the farm

brpther and sister picking bluebrries.jpg

Picking (and eating) our way through the bushes, my mind swirled with ideas of what to make with our indigo-fleshed fruit. Tarts, pancakes, and yogurt-topped breakfast bowls were the usual suspects on the top of my list, followed by jam, smoothies, and blueberry buttercream. In the end, we ate the berries mostly on their own, by the handful, fully savoring the sweetness that only Mother Nature can deliver.

blueberries Quinn Farm

This recipe was born out of my farm-to-table experience at Quinn.  It was also inspired by my beautiful niece,  who gave me a rundown behind the vegan philosophy. Although I probably won’t convert to a solely plant-based way of life anytime soon, I’m happy to try a vegan approach to cooking when I can make sound and delicious substitutions.

quebec maple syrup on plueberry pancakes

Trust me when I say that these are everything you could ever want in a pancake! Fluffy, moist, and packed with flavor, you might just need to make an extra batch….or two…or three.

Vegan blueberry pancakes (makes approximately 12 to 16 three-inch pancakes)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • ¾ cup soy milk (you can substitute any nut milk of your choice)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or coconut oil (if using coconut oil, make sure it’s in a liquid state)
  • 1 ripe banana, mashed
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest (optional)
  • 1 cup blueberries (you can use frozen, but your batter will risk turning blue)
  • Maple syrup to serve

Note that this recipe can easily be doubled or tripled if necessary.

Directions:

Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, sugar, and cinnamon (if using) in a large bowl. Set aside.

In a bowl or a large measuring cup, combine soy milk, mashed banana, vanilla,  and lemon zest.

Slowly whisk wet mixture into the dry, gently fold in the blueberries, and stir until just combined (do not over mix – you don’t want a rubbery pancake!). Let the batter rest for at least five minutes for the leavening agents to do their thing.

Preheat a non-stick pan or electric griddle over medium high heat. Please keep in mind that your pan must be hot in order for the pancakes to develop their characteristic fluffiness.

Drop batter onto the hot pan in circles using a small ladle or quarter cup measure.

Once the batter starts developing bubbles on the surface and the bottom begins to brown, flip over onto the other side until cooked through.

Serve immediately and drizzle with as much (or as little) maple syrup as your heart craves.

Bon appétit!

vegan blueberry pancakes lidija's kitchen

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I got it from my mama! A Mother’s Day post & a currant scone recipe

There’s a comfort in baking that I find difficult to put into words. Maybe it’s the memory I have of my mother immersed in her dough-making process in our flour-dusted kitchen. Or maybe it’s because as a young girl, my eager little hands would wait in anticipation to indulge in the fruits of her labor. Running to the kitchen at the first whiff of freshly baked bread, I can still remember how happy she was when she baked – singing and smiling like she was in her own secret world. For my mother, baking was an outlet that went far beyond cakes, cookies, and pies. Less about the end result, baking was a creative, soul-quenching time that gave her the chance to disconnect and let her imagination run wild and free.

Now fully immersed in the throes of motherhood, I find the same comfort in the kitchen that my mother did (although my singing voice isn’t nearly as good as hers). When I bake, time could literally stop and I probably wouldn’t notice. Yes, I really do find it that therapeutic! Whether it’s something as simple as whipping up a batch up fresh scones, or a bit more elaborate like a four-layered cake dripping in puddles of chocolate ganache, I find solace in folding fresh cream, melting chocolate, and swirling my whisk through ribbons of sugar and softly whipped egg yolks.

in the kitchen making scone dough

lidija and scones

A tiny part of me hopes my children will have the same memories that I have of my mother – with our flour-dusted kitchen table and my mama-bear-hands covered in dough.

I got it from my mama, and I know she would be proud.

Happy Mother’s Day!

Classic Currant scones

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 & ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 140 grams unsalted butter, cut into ¼ inch cubes and chilled
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup buttermilk (alternatively you can use ¼ cup full fat plain yogurt or cream mixed with ¼ cup milk with a squeeze of lemon juice)
  • ½ cup dried currants
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

* note that this recipe can be easily doubled if needed

Directions:

Mix flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar in a bowl. Set aside.

Put the flour mixture in a food processor fitted with a steel blade (you can also do this with an electric mixer or by hand). Pulse a couple of times to distribute the ingredients.

Add the butter to the flour, pulsing several times (as many as 40 times if your butter is super cold!). Remember not to run your food processor or mixer continuously at this point. You need to see little lumps of butter in the mixture.

Combine the milk, cream, egg, and vanilla in a bowl and mix until all the ingredients have been incorporated well.

Add the wet milk/egg mixture and the currants to the flour mixture.

With your hands, combine all the ingredients together without over-mixing.

Put the dough onto a large, lightly floured surface and form into a rough shaped disk, measuring approximately 2 to 3 inches high.

Cut rounds out of your dough using a fluted cookie cutter (alternatively, make free-form balls).

The amount of scones your dough will yield depends on the height of the dough and size of your scone cutter. This batch makes roughly 8 large to 14 small scones.

Place your shaped scones you’ve made on a parchment lined baking tray, and freeze for AT LEAST 30 minutes or longer (I usually make my scones the night before I serve them, and keep them in the freezer until ready to bake. You can also freeze the dough shapes for up to a month and use as needed. Remember to store them in airtight freezer bags if storing for a long period of time. you can bake the scones directly from the freezer).

scone dough shaped on a baking tray

Preheat your oven to 200 C (400 F) and position your baking rack in the center of the oven.

Bake the scones for 25 to 30 minutes (time varies depending on size), until tops are golden brown and the smell emanating from your oven is insanely delicious.

currant scones on cooling rack

hot scones ready to eat

Serve hot, cold, or in between.

scone tower part two

Bon appétit!

Photos by Tara Atkinson Photography 

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