Mango sorbet

There are some weeks that are so busy, I barely have time to sleep! This was definitely one of those weeks, and thankfully, for great reasons. Getting into a back-to-school routine with my kids added to the weeks’ challenge. It’s almost like post holiday September jetlag, even though I haven’t travelled since early on in the summer. Today is the first day in a couple of weeks that I’ve actually had time to sit down and write, which is just as well – I have a very simple and a propos recipe that I’m dying to bust out of my head!

I wrote a post about mangoes a few months back. It was the beginning of mango season, and Dubai was full of their sweet, succulent golden fleshed deliciousness. I bought several kilos and flash froze as much as I could stash in my freezer. I typically do this whenever I find seasonal fruit. That way, I always have ripe ingredients on hand to throw into smoothies, muffins, jams and fruit coulis.

Since I had very little time to shop for food this week, I had to dig deep into my culinary inventory (which was next to nothing), and find some quick and uncomplicated things to eat. With my freezer full of mangoes and a serious craving for something refreshing to beat the one hundred percent humidity clinging to Dubai’s north of forty temperatures (yes, I said 100 % humidity) – a mango sorbet was screaming my name!

The beauty of this sorbet is that there is no need for an ice-cream machine as there’s no churning required. It takes about 60 seconds to make and 30 seconds to eat – not bad for a dessert that only requires three ingredients. In order to get this sorbet right, your mango flesh MUST be frozen. Let it sit at room temperature for a few minutes until they soften ever so slightly. This will help the ingredients blend evenly in the food processor. If your mangoes aren’t frozen, you’ll get a soup instead of a sorbet. Trust me.

I used superfine caster sugar when I made it this week simply because it’s all I had on hand. You can certainly use agave nectar if you would like a less-refined sweetener. Keep in mind that you will have to lower the quantity of agave as it’s a lot more concentrated than sugar.

Special equipment:

  • Food Processor
  • Parchment Paper
  • Freezer safe container

Ingredients:

  • 450 grams ripe mango flesh, cut into chunks (use the flesh of 2 large mangoes or 4 small ones)
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons superfine caster sugar or agave nectar (if using agave, you will need to reduce the quantity – taste as you go!)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions:

Place the mango chunks on a large plate that’s been lined with parchment paper. Put in the freezer, uncovered, for at two hours or until frozen. This is called flash freezing.

mango-cutting

frozen-mango-chunks

Once the flesh is frozen solid, you can proceed with the recipe. You can also do this step in advance, simply put the flesh into freezer bags and close well. The mango will keep frozen for at least three months.

Remove the mango from the freezer and let it stand for five minutes to soften ever so slightly.

Put the chunks into a food processor along with the sugar and the lemon juice.

mango-sorbet-prep

mango-in-a-food-processor

Process all of the ingredients until super smooth and you achieve the texture of a bright yellowy-orange sorbet.

Immediately scrape out the contents of the food processor into a container. Cover, and freeze until scoopable.

mango-sorbet-puree

scoop-this-mango-sorbet-baby

The sorbet is at it’s best the day you make it, but will last up to five days in the freezer. It’ll be rock hard if you freeze it for a few days. Not a problem – let the sorbet sit at room temperature until it comes back to a smooth and scoopable consistency.

mango-sorbet-in-a-bowl

Hands down, this is one of the best sorbets ever. I almost forgot about the heat!

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Mango sorbet

  1. Pingback: Mango sorbet — Lidija’s Kitchen – Living a Gluten Free Lifestyle

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